Why you have to allow yourself to experience your emotions

Experience your emotions

As a child, adults often tell you not to cry, to ignore your sadness. Culturally speaking, we are taught to avoid all unpleasant emotions. At any cost. 

So, our impulse when we experience strong emotions is to escape them. We might do this by drinking too much alcohol, taking drugs, staying busy, emotional eating (or restricting food), smoking, and a number of other behaviors that harm us. 

Negative emotions often feel stronger than others. When you are dealing with heartbreak it feels as though the world is ending. No pain has ever felt so concentrated, so deep or so agonizing. 

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New and unexpected risks, a challenge when aging

New and unexpected risks become increasingly challenging as we move on in life. That’s partly because we have already invested heavy in coping with the risks we encountered earlier on. Risk management has become an important part of everyday modern life. This responsibility weights heavy on us. The more since it covers so many topics, such as physical, emotional, and social risks.

Path dependency

New and unexpected risks

This so-called path dependency makes us less resilient to new and unexpected risks. Growing old is an excellent example of such a new, albeit hardly unexpected, challenge. Aging is something we all hope for and at the same time is totally unavoidable.

Of late some debate originated on how we perceive the new and unexpected risks. The most important observation is that we tend to avoid the confrontation with these risks. We also tend to burden others with the handling of these risks. We tend to avoid responsibility and stop all critical self-reflection: ‘New and unexpected? Please not in my backyard!’

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A day in the life of a healthy 60-plusser

A healthy 60-plusser

When we were children, rarely we thought about health and fitness. Unless we got seriously ill, we lived without a care in the world. We ate junk food, played games for hours on end, and drank soda pops at midnight. And the best thing? We never had to pay for it. Our bodies were in superb condition no matter what we put them through!

As we get older, our thoughts invariably switch to our health. We realize that we simply cannot sustain a life of indulgence. We want to extend our life expectancy and be free of debilitating conditions, such as diabetes and osteoporosis.

So we have to get active and we have to keep fit.

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How we prevent the ‘oatmeal porridge catastrophe’

oatmeal porridge catastrophe

Will we all and only eat oatmeal porridge in 2050?
The answer is yes if we are to believe a recent article in the German newspaper Frankfurter Algemeine Zeitung. In 2050 10 billion people will inhabit the earth. The challenge is to stretch our agricultural capacities within the limits of our environmental capacities. If we can’t, we will all have to eat oatmeal porridge in 30 years.

Personally I am not a fan of porridge, let alone oatmeal porridge. Besides I am not sure that’s a healthy food. That’s why, in my personal view, it’s an obvious but also astoundingly interesting challenge to prevent the ‘oatmeal porridge catastrophe’.

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Portion distortion at your plate

Pasta Ratatouille Bake – One of my favorite recipes

A good health as well as a poor health are quite often attributed to our diet. There is a limited truth in this. Our age, the height and weight of our body, our lifestyle, and also our hormones, potential medication, and our health status, contribute to how we feel. As far as food can make us feel better, it is good to reflect on our dietary intake.

Good health, good weight, and good food

Although there is an abundant amount of information on the Internet on food, it’s very easy to get totally at loss. Just try to answer the question how you can combine the goal of a steady and acceptable weight, with a good health and exceptional good food. The best I found on the Internet is the ‘weight loss plan’ of the National Health Service (NHS UK – https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-weight/start-the-nhs-weight-loss-plan/).

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