How to cross personal and social boundaries

90 year old

Why does a woman of 90 say: “I am not old. My neighbor is old.” And how old is your neighbor? “91.” With her statement the 90 year old woman emphasizes her independence. She warns you not to cross her personal boundaries. To cross personal and social boundaries is an effort.

The fear of crossing personal and social boundaries is a common human quality. Most people don’t want to ask others for help. The fear of losing independence is the biggest psychological threshold. On the other hand, nearly everybody is willing and prepared to help others. 

To get something done we will have to cross our personal and social boundaries. Many personal issues we address with AGEwithCARE tackle this challenge.* Yet there is a limit in how much care you can take of yourself. Our personal time, space, and behavior just have their boundaries. How do we cross these boundaries? 

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New and unexpected risks, a challenge when aging

New and unexpected risks become increasingly challenging as we move on in life. That’s partly because we have already invested heavy in coping with the risks we encountered earlier on. Risk management has become an important part of everyday modern life. This responsibility weights heavy on us. The more since it covers so many topics, such as physical, emotional, and social risks.

Path dependency

New and unexpected risks

This so-called path dependency makes us less resilient to new and unexpected risks. Growing old is an excellent example of such a new, albeit hardly unexpected, challenge. Aging is something we all hope for and at the same time is totally unavoidable.

Of late some debate originated on how we perceive the new and unexpected risks. The most important observation is that we tend to avoid the confrontation with these risks. We also tend to burden others with the handling of these risks. We tend to avoid responsibility and stop all critical self-reflection: ‘New and unexpected? Please not in my backyard!’

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